karen_w_newton (karen_w_newton) wrote,
karen_w_newton
karen_w_newton

I'm back!

We just got back from Arizona this evening. We're tired but happy. Any trip without disasters is a good trip. We had no problems with our flight; we found the hotel (after giving up on the rental car GPS), we met my dad at the airport (I remembered just in time that international flights come in to a different gate & baggage claim); we had a lovely dinner with my old college roommate; and, best of all, right in the middle of the graduation ceremony, my daughter sent me a text that her grades had been posted and she passed everything! How was that for technology! It was an amazing illustration of how technology has changed things. When I scanned the field with binoculars, every fourth kid had a phone to his or her ear. Cell phones are how people find each other in crowds now.

After graduation, we finished cleaning out her apartment. Anything not worth shipping home we donated to a charity thrift shop. We still sent home four small and two large boxes of stuff, plus she had four suitcases and two carry-ons.

But before we came home, we made a trip to the Grand canyon. I have never been, and I didn't plan to get that close and not go, so we drove up from Tempe and stayed two nights in Tusayan, the small village outside of the Grand Canyon National Park. We spent a morning viewing the South Rim, did some souvenir shopping and had lunch, then relaxed at the hotel until it was time for dinner at El Tovar, the national park lodge that's perched on the South Rim. It was lovely!

Here are a few pictures. If you've never been, it's really something that lives up to the hype.



freehit counter








Tags: family, nature
Subscribe

  • The curse of YA, or Why is Harry Potter an orphan?

    I saw a link on Neil Gaiman's Facebook page to this NYT Books section essay about how prevalent bad or missing parents are in YA fiction. It's a…

  • More on "sticky books"

    Since my post of the other day, I have decided that either kids' books are more likely to be inherently sticky or that things we read when young are…

  • And a little child shall lead them

    The subject line refers not to religion, but to publishing. The Washington Post did away with their print Book World standalone section, which used…

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic
  • 10 comments

  • The curse of YA, or Why is Harry Potter an orphan?

    I saw a link on Neil Gaiman's Facebook page to this NYT Books section essay about how prevalent bad or missing parents are in YA fiction. It's a…

  • More on "sticky books"

    Since my post of the other day, I have decided that either kids' books are more likely to be inherently sticky or that things we read when young are…

  • And a little child shall lead them

    The subject line refers not to religion, but to publishing. The Washington Post did away with their print Book World standalone section, which used…